PIANIST ELEONOR BINDMAN IN CONVERSATION WITH ROBERT BEATTIE

Pianist Eleonor Bindman talks to Robert Beattie

Eleonor Bindman (c) Masataka Suemitsu

Eleonor Bindman is a New York based pianist and chamber musician who has received extensive praise for her piano transcriptions. The New York Times commented on her ‘lively, clear textured and urbane’ performances and ‘impressive clarity of purpose and a full grasp of the music’s spirit’. Eleonor has appeared at Carnegie Hall, The 92 Street Y, Merkin Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and on solo concerto engagements with the National Music Week Orchestra, the Staten Island Symphony, the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, the New York Youth Symphony, and The Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra of Moscow, Russia. She is a prize winner of the New Orleans, Busoni and Jose Iturbi international piano competitions and is a recipient of a National Foundation for the Advancement of the Arts award.

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‘Man of the People’: The 15th International Malcolm Arnold Festival online in October 2020

The 15th International Malcolm Arnold Festival
‘A Man of the People’
17 – 18 October 2020
Live-streamed and FREE to view

‘A Man of the People’ is the theme of this year’s Malcolm Arnold Festival; the annual celebration packed with music, films and talks on this multi-faceted composer and his music. Available online for the first time, listeners will be able to join proceedings via the website portal over 17th – 18th October 2020: for more information click here.

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Chelsea Opera Group Make Opera Live Again in November at Cadogan Hall  

Chelsea Opera Group present MAKE OPERA LIVE AGAIN –

A CONCERT OF LIVE OPERA MUSIC

At LAST, you can again enjoy real opera, played live and safely, in your presence, by a reduced Orchestra of Chelsea Opera Group with singers of international renown and success and selected players from the Chelsea Opera Group’s own Orchestra, performing in front of a real LIVE audience!

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A Suitable Stirring Solution for the Pandemic

Eternal gratitude is what I feel when my excellent ear training for the musicality of the spoken word is needed. Whatever the situation. It goes back to the time I was at London University’s Institute of Education, studying for the Postgraduate Certificate in Music Education, just specifically introduced for Music two years earlier. It would … Read more

Composer Alexey Shor in conversation with Colin Clarke

Alexey Shor (c) ALIKHAN

It is an exciting time for composer Alexey Shor. I personally first came across his music on a Delos release entitled Classical Music Stars in Malta in which four of his chamber pieces (Farewell Nocturne; Addio; King Matt the First; Coming of Age) shared disc space with music by Ilya Dimov, Khachaturian, Joseph Vella, and the fabulous Handel/Halvorsen Passacaglia. Then, the superstar violinist Maxim Vengerov, no less, performed Shor’s St. Elmo Barcarolle at the Barbican in January this year under the baton of a conductor who is a tireless champion of Shor’s music, Sergey Smbatyan (review); and Vengerov’s encore, after Bruch’s First Violin Concerto and Ravel’s Tzigane, was another work by Shor: his Elegy for violin and orchestra.

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Members of the public needed for Lost in Song and join a study to evaluate mood and general well-being

Call for participants for a study into the effects of virtual choral singing on mood and well-being

Brought to you by Limina Immersive, NHS Arden & GEM and Ex Cathedra, Lost in Song is a web-based application that has been specifically developed to lift spirits and provide an opportunity to experience the joys of choral singing from the comfort and safety of your own home. With songs arranged and performed by award-winning Birmingham-based choir Ex Cathedra, Lost in Song allows you to sing along with a choir, while enjoying 360 degree footage of natural landscapes from around the UK.

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Bampton Classical Opera returns to London’s St John’s Smith Square on 6 November with Gluck’s one-act opera The Crown

BAMPTON CLASSICAL OPERA 2020
Christoph Willibald Gluck ‘THE CROWN’ (‘LA CORONA’) composed 1765
Azione teatrale, in one act, sung in Italian with linking English narration

Concert Performance: St John’s Smith Square, London: 7.30pm Friday 6 November, 2020

Libretto: Pietro Metastasio
Conductor: Robert Howarth
CHROMA Ensemble

Bampton Classical Opera returns to the Baroque splendour of London’s St John’s Smith Square on 6 November with a concert performance of Gluck’s one-act opera The Crown, the first in the UK since 1987. The performance will also be filmed and available to watch on demand on the Bampton website from 9 November.

Composed in 1765 The Crown (La corona) glories in the sensuous beauty and virtuosity of the soprano voice.  It was written for four Viennese Archduchesses, daughters of the Holy Roman Emperor Francis I and the formidable Empress Maria Theresa, young singers for whom Gluck had already composed his delectable Il parnaso confuso, performed by Bampton in 2014. Both works set words by Pietro Metastasio and were destined for imperial family celebrations at the Hapsburg court theatre, although La corona was abandoned due to the Emperor’s death. In Bampton’s performance the florid arias – as thrilling as anything by Handel – will be sung in Italian, linked by a narration in English. Early music specialist Robert Howarth conducts, making his Bampton debut, and an outstanding cast includes Lucy Anderson, first prize-winner of the 2019 Bampton Young Singers’ Competition. The performance adds to Bampton’s noteworthy exploration of rarely-performed operas by Gluck, one of the most significant and melodious of eighteenth-century masters.

Synopsis: In his almost countless libretti, which made him the most popular of operatic poets in the first half of the 18th century, Metastasio plundered the classical myths for stories of valour and love. The Crown, like many others, derives from a story in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Meleagro, Prince of Calydonia, gathers a troupe of brave heroes to hunt and slaughter the ferocious wild boar which has been sent by the goddess Diana to devastate his realm. The opera however is concerned not with masculine prowess and bravery but with the role and ambitions of women. Atalanta, Climene and Asteria debate whether to join the chase, angry that only men can have the honour of gaining the crown of victory. When they consult Meleagro, he says the task is men’s work and warns that they will endanger themselves. Nevertheless, the girls cannot hold back: Atalanta wounds the boar and Meleagro is able to kill it. Each is reticent to accept the crown: in the end they offer it to the Emperor Francis, in whose honour the opera was commissioned.

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